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This week we talk with Emma D’Arcy all about what it means to deal with Imposter Syndrome and how it does indeed get better! Shawn & Emma talk about their own struggles and how the Dynamics Community has helped them not only overcome, but flourish and help to elevate others. They also talk a little bit about cats…

Emma D’Arcy on Twitter: @tattooedcrmgirl

Emma’s Imposter Syndrome session from Scottish Summit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dh9NaNsvDxE

Check out the video on YouTube: https://youtu.be/Txc9kMYnEAI

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Shawn Tabor:
I'm Shawn Tabor and Joel is not here. But I do have a guest, Miss Emma D'Arcy. How are you today, Emma?

Emma D'Arcy:
I am pretty great. How are you doing? Thank you for having me. This is exciting.

Shawn Tabor:
I am happy to have you. So if you're watching this on the YouTubes, you can see our happy little faces stuck in our homes. If you're if you're listening to CRM Audio, there'll be a link to the video in the show notes. So. But Emma, everybody a little bit about yourself, who you are, all that good stuff.

Emma D'Arcy:
Yes, I'm Emma D'Arcy. I'm a pre-sales consultant at ClickDimension. I've been there for three years. So working in the marketing space for three years. But I've been in the Dynamics space for about eight or nine years now. So while I'm from Ireland originally, but now actually living in Philadelphia. So a bit of a change.

Shawn Tabor:
How is that move from Greenville to Philadelphia?

Emma D'Arcy:
So, yeah, you're right. I was based in Greenville, South Carolina for five years and moved to Philadelphia almost two months ago and still fresh. I think the hardest part was getting the cat from Greenville, the 10 hour drive up to Philadelphia. A lot of cat drugs. I have some pictures of the cats really strung out, but they they were weaned off the drugs. They're cuddly currently cuddling in the corner beside me right now. Being real cute. So that was probably the hardest part.

Shawn Tabor:
The last time I saw you, we were having lunch and then we went to the cat. What was it called?

Emma D'Arcy:
The Cat Cafe. Yeah. Yes, that's wild.

Shawn Tabor:
That was fun.

Emma D'Arcy:
I can't believe they may have to. Soon as I left Greenville, they moved to Atlanta.

Shawn Tabor:
They said, let's pack it up. There's no point. .

Shawn Tabor:
Our patron. Our patron is done. We're leaving. But now apparently it's like a cat nightclub or something.

Emma D'Arcy:
They were trying to do that in Greenville. It was kind of weird. I didn't really vibe very well. So I hope it goes well for the Atlanta. I think they'll have more and more of an audience there.

Shawn Tabor:
So if you're having a cat nightclub, is that like really chill EDM or. I mean, I can't play thumping, the cats would be freaking out, wouldn't they?

Emma D'Arcy:
I have thumping music around here all the time. My cats are fine, so I don't think.

Shawn Tabor:
That's true but you've had them trained. So that's true. So we're all you know, we're all having to shelter in place, all that good stuff. Given this crazy time, what has what has working from home, how has it changed your. You're the way you go about your job or has it?

Emma D'Arcy:
So I've been fully remote for the last year anyway, so for me it hasn't changed that much. I guess the one thing that has changed is the fact that my sister is now home all day, every day, which is why you potentially hear some piano going on in the background. She's currently teaching music lessons . She's a music teacher. One of her jobs is being a music teacher. So right now for her, she does that remotely. We actually get along a lot better than I thought we would. I thought we would be, you know, at each other's necks all the time. But we've actually been having a great time. We livestreamed a dance party last Saturday, to mixer, which was hilarious. We did some Irish dancing on our kitchen counters to the whole world. But yeah, we seem to be actually doing all right.

Shawn Tabor:
To be honest, you know, what I find is you have to kind of have to let go. You know, you kind of have to not worry about stuff.And just for your sanity, you gotta do stuff to, you know, make the time go and to make yourself so happy.

Shawn Tabor:
Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So you mentioned mixer. You do a lot of stuff on mixer, a little bit about what you do on mixer.

Yeah. So on the mixer platform. It's a livestreaming platform, kind of similar to like a Twitch YouTube live. A lot of people would tend to use it for a more sort of gaming and some IRL web chats and stuff. What I'm doing a mixer is I'm actually livestreaming implementation of business processes for Dunder Mifflin, which for those who don't know what Dunder Mifflin is, it's the fictional office of the show, the office in the US. So we've been having a great time. We've been implementing a dashboard for Pam at the moment that allows her to keep track of when Michael's been taking naps so she can report back to Jan on her activities.But we're also actually looking at doing some lead assignment as well. So we're kind of putting into place that analysis program for time to look at all the salespeople in Dunder Mifflin and say, hey, this person has this amount of opportunities. So I'm actually going to assign this to Dwight instead of Jim because Jim's already at his quota, all that kind of thing. So we're putting a fun stand and actually implementing real life business scenarios.

Shawn Tabor:
Did you know that that sounds that sounds awesome. I love how you're using the fictional the fictional scenario to show the real life capabilities, but did you know that Joel Lindstrom has off his pops in his cube at Hitachi?

Shawn Tabor:
Yep. He has he has. He has Dwight. He has Michael. Toby. I think he has Jim.

Emma D'Arcy:
No way. I had no idea. What is this thing? That's hilarious. Yes.

Shawn Tabor:
Yes. Joe Lindstrom collects office pops.

Shawn Tabor:
But so one of the reasons I mean, outside of you just being awesome like you are, one of the reasons I wanted you to come on was recently you you went over, you know, when we could travel out of the country, you went over to Scotland for Scottish summit. Yes. So what was that like? Because that looks like. I don't even know. I mean, I've seen I've seen Microsoft.com conferences with smaller Agendas.

Emma D'Arcy:
So it was phenominal. Oh, my gosh. It was probably one of the best community events I've ever been to, primarily because, you know, the event itself was completely free for all attendees, but also the speakers that were there really wanted to be there. You know, they wanted to talk about the topics they were speaking about and also just getting to hang out with all of our close friends. You know, it was pretty much supposed to be like the first summit of the year. Right. So for me, it was like I hadn't seen a lot of these people since Amsterdam UG last year in March. So the likes of Keith Watling and Samit, I haven't seen any of those for like a year. So for me, it's like a big reunion with the people that inspired me to start my career in that community. More so. But yeah, It is absolutely amazing.

Shawn Tabor:
Well, that's great. You got to go. Given everything that's going on, it was right. I know. We're gonna get to go.

Emma D'Arcy:
Yeah, I was right before the peak of everything kind of gone south. To be honest, at least we did make some jokes about it back when It was OK to make jokes about it. You know, if if somebody had what it was has that we all have it now. But yeah, It was absolutely phenomenal event. It really was.

Shawn Tabor:
Yeah, it looked it looked amazing. I wish it could have. I wish it could've been over there in a way. I've done, you know, a few podcasts with Mark Christie. And he's got he's just got so much energy.

Emma D'Arcy:
I just don't know how he did it like he would he would text me at 3:00 a.m. his time. WhatsApp. Because I did the marketing for the event as well. And he's like, hey, we really need to get this email out tomorrow. Is that OK? And I was like, it's 3:00 a.m.. Why are you awake? I just don't know how he and Iain pulls off one of the most amazing events ever been to. It was so clean. It was so well organized. They had thought of everything up front. I never had any issues at all. It was really great.

Shawn Tabor:
That was awesome. Yeah, I'm hoping hoping to work with him this summer on a virtual service summit.

Emma D'Arcy:
If you need a marketer there, sign me up.

Shawn Tabor:
I'll add it to my list. Sure.

Shawn Tabor:
So. So you one of the things you talked about there was it it was very intriguing to me. The topic was the imposter syndrome. Yes. So how did how did that whole topic come to be for you to where you wanted to do a session on it?

Emma D'Arcy:
Oh, it's actually a really interesting story. I was part of the ad Greenville Hack Greenville Slack Channel, which is a slack channel for people that work in tech in the Greenville area. And one of the guys said that, you know, they were talking we're talking got into a conversation about imposter syndrome. And I was like, yeah, I feel like I have that very strongly myself. I had just started my career in pre-sales under Matt Wittemann. And then Matt left very shortly after that. And I very much felt unprepared for the job because I was literally doing it completely by myself. And so the imposter syndrome was real. And so one of the guys are like, hey, we're doing a code conference. I'd really like you to come and talk about your experience with the positive syndrome, which is when I went, I'm not qualified to speak on impostor syndrome. And they're like, that makes you qualified by definition.

Shawn Tabor:
You know, you're an imposter being an imposter. Exactly.

Emma D'Arcy:
Exactly. It's like, you know what? I'm gonna give it a go. I'm surely I'm not the only person that feels like this. So if I can at least get out and talk about my experiences, it might help somebody else to kind of feel not so alone. And so I did my first talk at a little group code meetup in Greenville, and it was really, really well received. And so I just decided, hey, this must be something I can probably take to the Microsoft community as a whole, because surely there are other people that feel this way. And I put out a tweet basically asking everybody, hey, you know what imposter syndrome is? If you do, would you mind sharing some of your stories with me? And the response I got was outstanding. Like, there were some really well known and DP, some really well known people in the community that would respond, saying, hey, I also feel this way. But people CBS, this leader in I don't know, let's say Nick Doelman, for example, knows Portal inside and out. He even came up and said, yeah, I experienced this myself all the time. So to me, it blew me away that leaders in our community feel this way. So therefore, imagine what somebody just coming into the community must feel like. They've got to feel this, too. So I wanted to bring some awareness to it and maybe share my experiences with how I actually handle it as well.

Shawn Tabor:
And yeah, I I have I have dealt with that many times in the past myself. Right. I mean, yeah, you're right. So what's what's crazy about it? Is once you have it, even when you kind of fill those gaps that you had and you attain a new level, you then get new ones. It just gets in you, you know.

Emma D'Arcy:
There's this amazing chart in the presentation that I have that I absolutely love. It's called a Dunner Kruger effect. And basically what it means is you start out not knowing anything at the very start of your career. And you're like, I know you don't know anything, you know. And then as you gain a little bit more experience, you start to say, oh, hey, I actually know things start to get a little bit ballsy, a little bit cocky, at least in my case. I definitely did. I clicked. I was like, you know, six months, an employee of the month twice. I knew all the answers was total baller. And, you know, move to a different role and realize, holy crap.So you start to realize that, you know what you don't know, so your confidence kind of takes a bit of a dive. So it is like this whole chart starts up here and then it kind of curves all the way down. Then you're like rock bottom when you're like, holy crap. Okay, I'm not this amazing, intelligent person. I don't know everything, but I do know what I don't know. So from there, you can either start to take what you know you don't know and focus on that and learn or you can just sit there and wallow in your self-pity forever. And then the cool thing is the chart does start to go back up as you figure out and learn things. And for me, I've definitely passed that bottom point now. I've been at that bottom point. I think when I started to get involved in the community, I see all these amazing people. I'm like, oh, my God, I literally know nothing. I did do something to try and combat that as well. That definitely helps. But I'm definitely on the up right now from that curve, which is nice.

Shawn Tabor:
That's awesome. Yeah. I when I when I hit that bottom part, one of the things that helped me get back up, you know, starting on that upward trend was when you realize what those issues are and you say to yourself, OK, I can't learn everything yet, but I can use my my imposter syndrome, my feelings of of inferiority to find others who don't or can fill that gap. Maybe I don't maybe I can't fill my own personal notes, but someone else can do it and I can empower them. Given this assumption that some people have. I can empower them to elevate themselves by doing that. It elevated me.

Emma D'Arcy:
And again, it's a huge part of the community as well, because, you know, I'm not going to be an expert in everything. You know, my area is gonna be marketing and sales. Whereas if I want to know something about field service, I'll come and ask you for one. Know something about customer service. I'll go ask Sarah. You know, I know the people that are experts in their area. I can go to that. So I think for people that are coming into this community, especially you or people that are kind of getting acclimated and learning about what our community is about, don't feel like you have to be a jack of all trades. It's OK for you to not know something. That's. That was a huge thing for me was like, you know, going into client meetings. I don't have to know all the answers. I think that was a mistake I made early on. And so I always thought that if I don't know the answer. I'm a total failure and total fraud and they're going to see through me and I'm gonna get fired, right? Yes. So, you know, it's OK not to know the answers. It's how you actually approach your response. And when you don't know, don't bluff it. Don't be like, oh, yeah, I think you could do this. Like that is gonna make it worse. Just saying, yeah, I don't know that I will go find out. I will do some research and people will appreciate that a lot more.

Shawn Tabor:
And I also find that, you know, like you said, you worked for a couple years with Matt Wittemann, you know, and early on in my career, you know, I worked with some some folks who are really brilliant. Right. Like at Hitachi I work with Joel. And JoelLindstrom is brilliant. And God help me, he's going to hear this. And I'm going to hear about it all the time. But anyways, he is. And what I found early on is I can't compare myself to him because we're different people. If I always try to be him, I'm going to fail because I'm not him. Right. I need to emulate the good things he does and the habits he has, which I've tried to do, but I can't be him. So he's got to stop trying to be him. That and that really that really helps. It really helps.

Emma D'Arcy:
It's one of the phrases that I actually have incorporate into my talks is don't compare your start to somebody else's middle. And that resonated so much with me, especially again when you come into this community fresh like I started out. I want to say I started out this community like a year ago. I went to Yuichi Summit, Amsterdam. That's where I met Sarah Critchley and Keith Watling for the first time, what an explosive combination, but they very much encourage me to start my own blog. But started in things that I wanted to write about. For me, it was really intimidating. I'm like, oh my God, these are like superstars in our community. I'm never going to be that good. But, you know, eventually I found my own way. I figured out my own branding, what I like. And, you know, I'm really enjoying it, hello, I have a cat.

Shawn Tabor:
But yeah, I just right now in my nerd cave, I only have Prudence here and Baby Yoda.

Emma D'Arcy:
Yeah, but yeah, it's it is amazing because I mean it depending on how you handle feelings like that imposter syndrome. They could either be really crippling. Yes. And destructive or really enabling and powerful.

Emma D'Arcy:
Exactly. Yeah. I mean you can take it either way. Like I said, you can like wallow and always be miserable. You're never going to be as good as anybody else. Which is not the case. I mean, again, don't compare your story to somebody else's battle. You will get there. It's all about your passion and drive is and what your actual motivation behind doing this is. If you're just in this for like, you know, the community fame or whatever, you know, that's not going to be it. You've got to be very passionate about the community and the work that you do.

Shawn Tabor:
One hundred percent. Hundred percent. Yeah. That was MVP for me, was always one of those kind of career goals early on. Yeah. You know, like I was chasing I was chasing the award and Never got it. And the reason for that is because I never put in the work to get it right. Once I stopped chasing the award and just embraced the community like you're saying, you know, I met people and then I got it right. And now it's so much more rewarding because, you know, we have we have to look at renewal time. We have to put. We have to answer these four questions. Right. And one of the answers for me is it's just so rewarding to know people and meet people and help people. And being in that position is amazing. So it's not so much the award, It's a place in a community, right? Yep. Yeah. Yeah. And in the way that you can learn from other people like and I'm going to regret this too. But I've learned so much from Sarah as well. You know, and she just goes 90 miles an hour all the time. Yeah. You got to say hey, cal it down. Bring it down a notch, but like her and Matt Wittemann and Joel and, you know, even George and Jonas and all these all these people that I met and Julie Yack, everybody. Yeah. I've just learned I've learned so much from them in so many different things. You know, it's not all it's not all about. I learned dynamics, things. I learned different things from them. And I and I feel that they they've made me a better person and they've been able to handle things differently. And then in turn, I've been able to elevate and bring people up. Yeah.

Emma D'Arcy:
I kind of I totally understand. I feel like I'm kind of coming around to that as well. Sarah has been instrumental in helping me get started in my career and with community as well. She's always there. If I ever need anything from like moral support, anything. She's always there.

Shawn Tabor:
She's a rock.

Emma D'Arcy:
Yes, she's a rock. I feel like, you know, I want to I want to give back some of that's the community so that we do have some newer people in our community, especially in the Greenville area, that are like, you know, getting more involved in our community and doing their own thing. For example, Mary Thompson out in Columbia, South Carolina. She's setting up her own Power Platform community down there at its heart in Greenville. I are in Columbia because it's South Carolina. Yes, it's quite small, but I am blown away by her passion and her drive. And she's like determined to do this. So if I can at least, you know, introduce her to the right people or help out in some way, I want to do that. I want to help other people grow.

Shawn Tabor:
Yeah. Yeah. And the community is amazing because, you know, with with the whole Corona virus thing, you know, my all the teachers are teaching from home. You know, like my my daughter and my wife and my daughter had something where she wanted to something for social studies for her students, where they're learning about different countries. And I put out I put out on the MVP channel and asked just, you know, if any interested in answering questions about your country and your culture for a group of third grade students. And the response was amazing. They were all about it. Oh, it was fantastic.

Emma D'Arcy:
It was fantastic for me, so happy. Yeah.

Emma D'Arcy:
That's another thing I love. Like the community is so expansive. You could go anywhere in the world at this stage. You always have someone to hang out with. Always. Yes. It's fantastic.

Shawn Tabor:
Yeah, it was kind of funny when my daughter was saying, well, where do you have friends? And I started just naming off countries. Yeah. And she's like, no. She's like, no, not like Facebook friends. I said, no,These are literally friends. These are actual friends. And it was amazing. Yeah. So we're gushing about the community with me.

Emma D'Arcy:
That's what I do all day.

Shawn Tabor:
Going back to coming back to the imposter syndrome. That is that that type of community is what can lift you out of that. Because someone is going to say, you know, you know, like early on in my career when someone came up to me and said, oh, I retweeted you or or when we first did the podcast, when someone came with me, said, oh, I love the podcast. I didn't know what to do with that. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. You know, they. Thanks. Yeah. Yeah.

Emma D'Arcy:
It felt like I still get that the end of my imposter syndrome talk. It was very emotional. I was also quite hung over. That's probably why I was so raw and emotional giving this talk. What are you going to do? People at the end of it, You know, I always ask them if anybody wants to share their own personal stories using one or two people do. In this case, everyone was like really supportive of each other. You know, Keith got off and he said he's just started a new role. And he says he's got imposter syndrome real hard right now at that because he's going from being a user to being a consultant. And that's a big change. And so he's got it down pretty hard with that. You know, he shared that. And honestly, I was tearing up listening to him. I was like, oh, my God, you are a phenomenal superstar in our community. I can't believe that you feel this way. And other people were like, you know, coming up to him after it's like, dude, you got this, you're going to do great. You have so support of all of us. And there was so much hug and so much love and so many tears.I was just like, it was amazing. So and then you bring it up to me and tell me that my talk was, know, helpful and inspirational. I was like, do I get to call myself a motivational speaker?

Shawn Tabor:
You're motivated and you spoke. So, yes, you can. Right. Yes. So super, super cool.

Emma D'Arcy:
That is awesome. What can we be able to link your slides to the show notes so people if they want, that's a recording of the session.

Emma D'Arcy:
There's a full live recording.

Shawn Tabor:
Even better. Even better. So we'll put a link to that show notes so everybody can experience it.

Emma D'Arcy:
I wanted to just say that Christie chose a very interesting thumbnail for this video. Don't be put off by the thumbnail picture. It's pretty shocking. I have a video that I gave at the start of every one of my talk. I had like this video of me doing teddy bear rolls. It's fake. My legs are in the air in this thumbnail. Looks very questionable, but it's a good talk. I promis.

Shawn Tabor:
We'll keep that in mind. Was like this, you know, if YouTube didn't take it down, you're fine.

Shawn Tabor:
So. OK, well, we'll leave that to show notes. But this is dad. This has been so much fun.

Shawn Tabor:
I'm so glad we go to have you on.

Shawn Tabor:
You know, it's so crazy. It was it was just about a year ago that we finally met in person yet. At the Hitachi customer conference. Yes. So what a year it has been.

Emma D'Arcy:
I know. Can't get over how insane things have gotten. But I've loved literally every second of it. I wouldn't change it for the world's.

Shawn Tabor:
Me too. Me too. Well, tell everybody where how they can reach you if you wanted to be reached on the interwebs.

Emma D'Arcy:
If my cat will let me have my headset.

Emma D'Arcy:
Yes, I am on Twitter primarily. I usually tweet about angry airport things, but that won't be happening for a while. So I. You at girl? Girl? Yes. I got my name from Tatooed crm Guy. For those of you that are wondering, Chris did give me my name. And I'm also on Twitter. I've got a blog. tattooed crm girl.com. I tend to tweet a lot or tweet a lot. I blog a lot about marketing dynamics and actually some productivity stuff lately, which has been fun. And then I do have an Instagram. There's a link to Instagram on my blog. Is primarily just cats and plants. So I don't know if anybody wants to see that. You can check that out. It's also on the blog. That's where you can find me.

Shawn Tabor:
We'll put all that in the show. Notes in Emma for real. This has been just so much fun.

Shawn Tabor:
And I enjoy talking. So for everybody listening on the podcast, thank you for tuning in again. We'll have all the links to the video on the show notes. And for those of you watching on YouTube, if you want to re-listen to the podcast. You can't in your car. Oh, wherever you get podcasts. So with that, we'll sign off. Thank you for listening. And we'll see you next time.

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